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World Aquarium In Dallas

Best Tourist Places In Dallas,World Aquarium In Dallas,An old warehouse at 1801 North Griffin Street, near the Historic West End District in downtown Dallas, became the original site of The Dallas World Aquarium, opening to the public in October 1992. Built in 1924, the empty warehouse had been occupied until 1982. During those years it was used for various industries, including the Mohawk Rubber Company and Pioneer Steel Rule and Die. The adjacent building at 1815 North Griffin was purchased in 1996. Built in 1929 as a warehouse for the storage of rubber goods, it was later used by a Venetian blind company in the early 50s and lastly prior to the aquarium’s expansion, as a restaurant/bar known as “Tejano Rodeo.” As with the first building, the interior was completely demolished, leaving only the brick walls and support structure. The alley between the two buildings became the “channel” between the freshwater and saltwater ecosystems. The ORINOCO – Secrets of the River opened to the public in October 1997. The vacant lot at 1814 Laws Street (behind 1801 North Griffin) was purchased in May 2000 for the first newly constructed portion of the facility. Construction on the Mundo Maya exhibit started in April 2002 and opened to the public in August 2004. The Dallas World Aquarium has been accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) since 1997 and a member of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) since 2000.
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Dallas Museum of Art

Best Tourist places In Dallas Museum of Art,Established in 1903, the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA) is among the 10 largest art museums in the country and is distinguished by its commitment to research, innovation and public engagement. At the heart of the Museum and its programs is its global collection, which encompasses more than 24,000 works and spans 5,000 years of history, representing a full range of world cultures. Located in the nation’s largest arts district, the Museum acts as a catalyst for community creativity, engaging people of all ages and backgrounds with a diverse spectrum of programming, from exhibitions and lectures to concerts, literary events, and dramatic and dance presentations. Since the Museum’s return to free general admission in 2013, the DMA has welcomed more 3.2 million visitors. Museum History: The Dallas Art Association was organized in 1903 and was a direct outgrowth of the Art Committee of the Public Library. At the suggestion of Frank Reaugh, the well-known Texas artist, an art gallery, properly lighted and arranged, was provided for in the building. When completed, this room was most attractive, and the late Mr. J. S. Armstrong, himself a member of the building committee, became so interested in procuring pictures for the gallery that he offered to give half of any amount that could be raised for the purpose. Accordingly, the Art Committee of the Dallas Public Library was formed and consisted of the following members: Mrs. Henry Exall Mrs. Sidney Smith Mrs. J. E. Schneider Mrs. George K. Meyer The members immediately set to work raising funds for the purchase of pictures of recognized value. In the autumn of 1902, they gave an exhibition in the art gallery that was by far the best collection which had ever been brought to Texas at that time. These works of art were secured through the influence of the late Mrs. Sidney Smith from the Fair Association, which generously loaned its entire collection to the new gallery. An admission fee of twenty-five cents was charged for the exhibit, and the first person to present herself was Mrs. C. E. Fargo, who paid one dollar for admission, the first dollar collected for the art gallery.
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The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza In Dallas

Best Tourist Places In Dallas-The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza has lost a dear friend and an important part of early institutional history with the passing of Nancy Goff Cheney. A founding board member of the Dallas County Historical Foundation (which later became The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza), Nancy served a vital role as the Dallas County Historical Foundation’s direct conduit and liaison to the Kennedy family during the critical development of The Sixth Floor exhibit in the mid 1980s.

Cheney’s first encounter with John F. Kennedy took place when the young senator visited Dallas on the 1960 presidential campaign trail; three years later she and one of her daughters, Allison, watched the presidential motorcade pass by on the day of the assassination. In 1979 Allison was responsible for introducing her mother to the Kennedy family after meeting Senator Edward Kennedy at the University of Oklahoma. The Cheney family helped open Ted Kennedy’s Dallas campaign office, and Allison worked on Kennedy’s staff during his unsuccessful bid for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1980. At the Democratic Convention in New York City that year, the senator invited the family to visit his campaign suite at the Waldorf Astoria.

After learning of Nancy Cheney’s connection to the Kennedy family, Lindalyn Adams, a local preservation activist who was spearheading The Sixth Floor Project, briefed her on the plan to open a historical exhibition on the sixth floor of the former Texas School Book Depository building and asked if Nancy would consider passing along information about the Dallas endeavor to Senator Kennedy. Initially, Cheney was hesitant to approach the late president’s brother about the exhibit, but out of respect for Adams, she agreed to tour the space and learn more about it. The experience changed her mind, and she immediately agreed to speak with Senator Kennedy in his Washington office.

According to Cheney’s oral history with the Museum, when she nervously broached the subject of The Sixth Floor exhibit with Ted Kennedy in his private office, the senator’s face “turned the color of a [white] sheet.” She explained that hundreds of thousands of individuals visited Dealey Plaza every year in memory of the late president with flowers and prayers, wondering “why Dallas hasn’t done something at this place to honor the president.” When she finished her presentation, Kennedy replied, “Nancy, I have all the confidence in the world in you, and if you say it’s going to be all right, I know that it will be.”

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